social

Keeping Trick or Treaters and Pets Safe on Halloween

Halloween is around the corner, and people everywhere are looking forward to being scared and dressing up in costumes. The same is not true for dogs or cats, however. The mischief for which the holiday is infamous present a myriad of potential dangers that can take dogs, cats, and their owners completely by surprise.

Advertisement

If you want to include your dog in your Halloween celebration, make it an event that is safe and enjoyable for both of you. Here are some tips:

  • People love Halloween candy and so do dogs, but while candy is a great treat for us, dog owners need to make sure that it's not accessible to their animals. Most owners know that chocolate is poisonous for dogs, but so is almost everything else that you'd find in a trick-or-treat bag. Artificial sweeteners, raisins, and other candy items can mean serious health hazards or even death for dogs. The wrappers can be ingested and cause choking. Keep healthy, natural-ingredient dog treats on hand for your dog and other dogs that might show up at your door. Just before opening the door, you might give your dog a tiny treat.

  • Advertisement

  • Your dog potentially could be hit by eggs or other thrown objects if left out in the yard alone. It's better to be safe than sorry. Keep your dog safe from Halloween tricks by keeping it in the house and not alone in the yard.

  • If you're having a party, make sure your dog is in another room. Dogs are curious about strangers in the home, and even familiar people can cause confusion and stress when dressed strangely. Dogs may be frightened by unusual costumes, especially those with flashing lights or odd sounds such as a monster voice or high-pitched witch's screech. A party also presents additional food challenges. Make sure the human treats, especially alcoholic drinks, are not accessible to your dog.

  • Decorations and dogs are usually a bad pairing. New objects in the house are likely to arouse your dog's or cat's curiosity, and it could get tangled on light cords or accidentally knock over candles. Cornstalks and pumpkins look great outside, but could be tempting chewing material if within your dog's reach in your home. If your dog swallows any of these substances, it might suffer an upset stomach or more serious intestinal problems.

  • Advertisement

  • If your dog is OK with wearing a costume, make sure the costume is comfortable, not too warm, and doesn't have any parts that could be chewed, swallowed, or tripped on. Have your dog try on the costume a few times before the big night, and if it seems uncomfortable, allergic, or frightened, don't force the issue. A Halloween bandana or an orange collar and leash are good alternatives for dogs who don't like costumes for elaborate costumes. Most dogs are OK wearing sweaters, so if you do buy a costume for him, make it one that resembles a sweater in the way it's made. And make sure there are no flashing lights or noises on it either. They would only frighten your dog.

  • Many people will put their dog in a bedroom or another room while trick or treaters are coming. Although the idea behind this is good, it's actually worse on the dog. Keeping your dog in another room when the doorbell is constantly ringing is extremely upsetting for him. The dog is simply trying to protect it's owners and by putting him in another room you are stopping him from protecting you and the dog will get even more upset every time the door rings.

  • Advertisement

  • A better method is to barricade a section around the front door, or to barricade a section of the living room. The barricade will make it so that the dog can not get to the door, but it can still see who's there. Teach the dog to quiet down when you tell him he's barked enough. I taught mine (by squirting them in the butt to get their attention, then saying "enough" very sternly till they hushed. It didn't hurt them at all and they learned quickly, only a few squirts. After that all I had to do was pick up the bottle. They are allowed to bark at the door until I open it and then I say "enough", then they quiet down. The dog needs to see that you are safe and there's no danger at the door.

  • Cats on the other hand, should be put in a bedroom, but I usually set up a table or chair for her to sit on at the window if she wants. This way I don't have to worry about her scooting out the door if she gets scared with all the commotion at the door. And she can watch safely, but leave the window as she pleases.

Advertisement

By Cricket from NC

Add your voice! Click below to comment. ThriftyFun is powered by your wisdom!

Anonymous
October 30, 20160 found this helpful

Sad to say, but some people think of cats as companions to witches or sinister forces-- especialy, but not only, black cats or mostly black, and especially on Halloween. Cat parents should think about protecting their cats from mischief, or worse.

Reply Was this helpful? Yes
October 30, 20160 found this helpful

Sad to say, but some people think of cats as companions to witches or sinister forces-- especialy, but not only, black cats or mostly black, and especially on Halloween. Cat parents should think about protecting their cats from mischief, or worse.

Reply Was this helpful? Yes
Advertisement

Add your voice! Click below to comment. ThriftyFun is powered by your wisdom!

In This Page
Categories
SafetyOctober 25, 2011
Pages
More
🍂
Thanksgiving Ideas!
😷
Coronavirus Tips
🎃
Halloween Ideas!
Instagram
Contests!
Newsletters
Ask a Question
Share a Post
Sub-Categories
AdviceBooksCandyCostumesCraftsDecorationsGamesGhost StoriesHaunted HouseHistoryJokesLinksMake UpMiscellaneousPartiesPartiesPhotosPumpkin CarvingRecipesSafetyTipsTreats
Published by ThriftyFun.
Desktop Page | View Mobile
Disclaimer | Privacy Policy | Contact Us
Generated 2020-10-29 11:13:31 in 1 secs. ⛅️️
© 1997-2020 by Cumuli, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
https://www.myfrugalhalloween.com/tf82248298.tip.html